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John A Morrison's Blog – August 2012 Archive (4)

The Duhem-Quine thesis and experimental economics A reinterpretation

The Duhem-Quine thesis and experimental economics A reinterpretation

Morten Søberg

Abstract:



The Duhem-Quine thesis asserts that any empirical evaluation of a theory is in fact a composite test of several interconnected hypotheses. Recalcitrant evidence signals falsity within the conjunction of hypotheses, but logic alone cannot pinpoint the individual element(s) inside the theoretical cluster responsible for a false prediction. This paper…

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Added by John A Morrison on August 12, 2012 at 10:30pm — 1 Comment

Econometric Pornography on G+

I call this post "pornography" its a repository of old re-prints in modern econometrics and related stuff.....

I intend to keep updating it as stuff comes to my attention;

its the kind of [old] logical (positivist) material I really like;

.. all the comments come with this link  ……

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Added by John A Morrison on August 7, 2012 at 1:15pm — No Comments

" Political Economics " Stuff I really like! A new 'discipline' (2 me!)

Stuff I really like! A new 'discipline'; some references;-

Political Economics : Explaining Economic Policy

 …

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Added by John A Morrison on August 5, 2012 at 7:57am — 1 Comment

Divide and Recombine for the Analysis of Large Complex Data

by

William Cleveland, Saptarshi Guha, Ryan Hafen, Jianfu Li, Jeremiah Rounds, Bowei Xi, and Jin Xia

Abstract



Divide and Recombine (D&R) is an approach to the analysis of large complex data. The data are parallelized: divided into subsets in one or more ways by the data analyst. Numeric and visualization methods are applied to each of the subsets separately. Then the results of each method are recombined across subsets. By introducing…

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Added by John A Morrison on August 4, 2012 at 9:37pm — No Comments

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