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I am sure many of you know of Alexa.com. Many years ago most people got annoyed with Alexa as it's toolbar was budled with some freeware. It was just considered as malware. It was not until two years ago when I needed to analyse which real estate companies from the Algarve were the most popular on the Web when I realised that it could be useful sometimes.

This is what Alexa has to say about AnalyticBridge:

Analyticbridge.com has a traffic rank of: 232,850

Analyticbridge.com users come from these countries:
India 27.0%
United States 18.0%
Switzerland 10.0%
Italy 5.6%
United Kingdom 4.3%
Other countries 34.8%

Views: 189

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Comment by John A Morrison on January 19, 2009 at 12:17am
I think its a first post thing, Vincent, right Peter?
Comment by Peter Lindmark on January 18, 2009 at 12:31pm
Thanks for your comment Vincent. You are entirely right that Alexa is flawed, considering their methodology. Quantcast is more exact. However, when I had to analyse the Algarve real estate market, I could not use Quantcast because none of the agencies had uploaded the required script on their pages. www.union-legend.com has the required script now.
Comment by Vincent Granville on January 18, 2009 at 9:48am
Alexa numbers are notoriously flawed. See quantcast.com/analyticbridge.com for numbers that are considerably more accurate, and close to our internal numbers. In particular, US is #1, UK #4 after India and Canada. People with Asian ethnicity, postgraduate and higher income are over-represented. We have many visitors from New York but few from Los Angeles.
Comment by John A Morrison on January 18, 2009 at 8:10am
Most Interesting Peter, thankyou for sharing the demographics, one would obviously question (and speculate too) why the UK is so lightly represented. Any ideas out there? John

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