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"Best Practice" quality Analytics and Decisioning just beginning in our Medical / Healthcare Delivery Systems

I have just returned from the first ever ICHI (= International Conference on Healthcare Informatics) at which I discovered a "new generation" of healthcare researchers and policymakers, mostly under the age of 35 ... BUT with an UNDERSTANDING and PASSION of what needed to take place to get out of being in about 33rd place in the world in the quality of health care delivery and replacing it with ACCURACY / PATIENT CENTERED EFFECTIVENESS / and EFFICIENT COST EFFECTIVE processes that match what almost every business and commercial concern now has to do to continue existing !!!! ................and then I see this NEWS REPORT:

http://www.informationweek.com/healthcare/clinical-systems/hospital...

HOW TIMELY !!!! Precisely what I discovered myself at last week's ICHI conference in Philadelphia......

Among other things, this report states:

".....Also revealing was the fact that more than half of C&BI users said they were using the analytic modules imbedded in their electronic health record/hospital information system (EHR/HIS). In contrast, less than a quarter of the C&BI users had purchased "best of breed" solutions, which tend to be more robust than those in EHR/HIS products......"

This is exactly what I have discovered during the past two years in writing a book on PRACTICAL PREDICTIVE ANALYTICS and INFORMATICS DECISIONING for MEDICAL RESERARCH and HEALTHCARE [to be released in 2014 as the 3rd in our "trilogy of PA books"].............e.g., what little PA/Decisioning is embedded in some of the over 2700 EHR / HIS companies’ software is apparently rudimentary, and from what I've seen is mostly aimed at "how to capture as much money as possible" from Medicare and private insurance claims, with little if any emphasis on capturing "good, comparative effectiveness, EBM" data that is needed to validate or deny that the treatments being used are really effective, and thus needed.

As I mentioned in the above paragraph, upwards of 2700 different companies / EHR systems have been developed since 2006; 2006 was the year that the RAND STUDY concluded that EHR systems were not only needed but would save healthcare delivery costs !!!

Now, ask yourself: "Why did over 2700 companies develop EMR (Electronic Medical Record systems) over the past several years? What was the incentive?

WHAT has been THE RESULT? The past winter the RAND STUDY GROUP released a 2nd report basically saying that they had made a "mistake" in their 2006 study and that the EMR systems in use had INCREASED healthcare delivery costs by of $9-BILLION.... and concluded that it was time to "go back to the drawing boards".

I believe one of the reasons that these EHR / EMR systems have increased costs, rather than bringing about more efficient, cost effect health care delivery, is because they failed to incorporate "best practice" PRACTRICAL PREDICTIVE ANALYTICS / DECISIONING into their systems.

Now the "chickens are coming home to roost" !!!!!

PRESCRIPTION: Effective PREDICTDIVE ANALYTIC ANALYTICS, DECISILONING SYSTEMS, and Patient Centered Effectiveness research, like the PCORI is bringing about will have to be incorporated into the electronic medical healthcare data systems OR maybe we need to "START OVER AGAIN from SCRATCH" and built it "right" !!!.

Such a prescription was suggested in the following July 2013 white paper:

Data Analytics: The Prescription for High Health Care Costs

http://www.informationweek.com/whitepaper/healthcare/policy/data-an...

 

It might be worthwhile reading this white paper ......

 

 

Views: 378

Tags: Care, EHR, EMR, HIS, Health, analytics, centered, costs, decisioning, effectiveness, More…informatics, patient, predictive

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